The Donovan Law Group

Will Victims of the BP Oil Gusher Also Be Victims of Class Action Lawsuits and the BP Oil Spill Victim Compensation Fund?

Will Victims of the BP Oil Gusher Also Be Victims of Class Action Lawsuits
and the BP Oil Spill Victim Compensation Fund?

By Brian J. Donovan

July 16, 2010

INTRODUCTION

The question is whether victims of the BP oil gusher will have to pay thrice: (a) once for the gusher, the environmental and economic damages of which will devastate their way of life and leave many in financial ruin; (b) again for daring to demand justice, which will consume their time, energy and hopes for years to come if they are held hostage by class action lawsuits; and (c) a third time by being mislead and undercompensated by the “BP Oil Spill Victim Compensation Fund (BPOSVCF).”

THE BP OIL GUSHER

The damages suffered by victims of the BP oil gusher will be enormous and on-going. The livelihoods of all persons whose businesses rely on the natural resources of the Gulf Coast are at risk. Commercial fishermen, oyster harvesters, shrimpers, and  businesses involved, directly or indirectly, in processing and packaging for the seafood industry will experience the end of a way of life that, in many cases, has been passed down from one generation to the next.

Pursuant to the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA), for an offshore facility the total of the liability of a responsible party and any removal costs incurred by, or on behalf of, the responsible party, with respect to each incident shall not exceed the total of all removal costs plus $75,000,000.

However, this limit on liability “does not apply if the incident was proximately caused by gross negligence, willful misconduct of, or the violation of an applicable federal safety, construction, or operating regulation by, the responsible party, an agent or employee of the responsible party, or a person acting pursuant to a contractual relationship with the responsible party.”

OPA broadened the scope of damages (i.e., costs) for which an oil spiller would be liable. Under OPA, a responsible party is liable for all cleanup costs incurred, not only by a government entity, but also by a private party. In addition to cleanup costs, OPA significantly increased the range of liable damages to include the following:

• injury to natural resources,
• loss of personal property (and resultant economic losses),
• loss of subsistence use of natural resources,
• lost revenues resulting from destruction of property or natural resource injury,
• lost profits resulting from property loss or natural resource injury, and
• costs of providing extra public services during or after spill response.

Given BP’s documented violation of federal safety regulations aboard the Deepwater Horizon, e.g., using an improper cementing technique to seal the well, failing to adequately test and maintain blowout prevention equipment and drilling deeper than BP’s federal permit allowed, there will be no limitation on BP’s liability. (Oil Pollution Act of 1990, 33 U.S.C. 2704).

Furthermore, BP may be liable to the United States and to Louisiana for damages resulting from lost royalties. Pursuant to Section 2702 of OPA, “Notwithstanding any other provision or rule of law, and subject to the provisions of this Act, each responsible party for a vessel or a facility from which oil is discharged, or which poses the substantial threat of a discharge of oil, into or upon the navigable waters or adjoining shorelines or the exclusive economic zone is liable for the removal costs and damages specified in subsection (b) of this section that result from such incident…”, including revenue losses such as “taxes, royalties, rents, fees, or net profit shares due to the injury, destruction, or loss of real property, personal property, or natural resources, which shall be recoverable by the Government of the United States, a State, or a political subdivision thereof.” (Oil Pollution Act of 1990, 33 U.S.C. 2702(b)(2)(D)).

BP also faces uncapped liability under a little-known Clean Water Act (CWA) civil damages provision.

Pursuant to Section 1321 of the CWA, “Any person who is the owner, operator, or person in charge of any vessel, onshore facility, or offshore facility from which oil or a hazardous substance is discharged in violation of paragraph (3), shall be subject to a civil penalty in an amount up to $25,000 per day of violation or an amount up to $1,000 per barrel of oil or unit of reportable quantity of hazardous substances discharged. In any case in which a violation of paragraph (3) was the result of gross negligence or willful misconduct of a person described in subparagraph (A), the person shall be subject to a civil penalty of not less than $100,000, and not more than $3,000 per barrel of oil or unit of reportable quantity of hazardous substance discharged.” (Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C. 1321).

Under the CWA, the basic fine is $1,100 per barrel spilled. But the penalty can rise to $4,300 a barrel if a federal court rules the spill resulted from gross negligence. As noted above, the fines were originally set at $1,000 to $3,000 but that was raised in 2004 to keep up with inflation. Accordingly, the number of barrels of oil being released from the well is going to be critical.

If the government pursues civil fines based on the volume of oil spilled, it would take into consideration whether BP has made its best effort to mitigate the spill, its prior history of offenses, if any, and whether BP can bear the cost of fines, among other factors. BP received the third-largest criminal penalty, of $50 million, for an environmental offense in U.S. history for a Texas City refinery fire in 2005. BP subsidiaries remain under federal probation for prior offenses in Texas and Alaska.

As of July 16, 2010, regardless of whether you prefer to say “spill” or “gusher,” these are the numbers to consider:

Total Amount of Oil Released to Date: 4,675,000 barrels
Amount of Oil Recovered by BP to Date (via Containment Cap): 826,800 barrels
Oily Water Recovered (via Skimming): 792,857 barrels of oily water = 79,286 barrels of oil
Oil Consumed by Controlled Burns: 261,191 barrels
Total Amount of Unrecovered Oil in the Gulf of Mexico to Date: 3,507,743 barrels

In this case, “Barrels Spilled” means “Oil Consumed by Controlled Burns” + “Total Amount of Unrecovered Oil in the Gulf of Mexico” = 261,191 + 3,507,743 = 3,768,934 barrels of oil spilled.

Under the CWA alone, gross negligence penalties based upon 3,768,934 barrels of oil spilled would equal $16,206,416,200. This equates to a penalty of approximately $191 million per day. BP’s net profits in the first quarter of 2010 were approximately $6.7 million per day.

It is obvious why BP, despite having the ability to obtain a very accurate flow rate, does not want a more accurate oil spill measurement. It is also very obvious why BP does not want to collect a great deal of the oil spill. Since April 22, 2010, BP admits that its skimming operations have been able to recover only 792,857 barrels of oily water. This equates to collecting a total of only 79,286 barrels of oil from the Gulf of Mexico since April 22, 2010.

The federal government has abdicated its responsibility. Pursuant to OPA Section 4201, and given that the BP oil spill is a “discharge posing substantial threat to public health or welfare,” President Obama should have federalized the collection of the oil that is in the sea and the restoration of the coastal areas impacted by the oil. Both of these activities could be done without having to federalize the operational priority of stopping the flow of oil from the well.

The Obama administration has no intention of holding BP accountable under either OPA 90 or CWA. Under the CWA, BP faces fines of up to $4,300 for each barrel spilled. Furthermore, pursuant to Section 2702 of OPA 90, BP would be required to pay royalties (18.75%) owed to the federal government for the oil gushing from the well.

If the federal government intended to collect $4,300 and a royalty of 18.75% for each barrel spilled, it would:

(a) try to have at least a very rough estimate of the number of barrels gushing from the BP well. This estimate does not exist. From April 28th to May 27th, the official estimated flow rate was 5,000 bbl/day. This intentionally underestimated amount of oil being released from the BP well was from NOAA, not BP. NOAA fully supported, and continues to fully support, BP’s strategy to underestimate the amount of oil being released from the well. “I think the estimate at the time was, and remains, a reasonable estimate,” said Dr. Lubchenco, the NOAA administrator. “Having greater precision about the flow rate would not really help in any way. We would be doing the same things.”

(b) collect every barrel of oil that is released into the Gulf of Mexico before it reaches the marshes of Louisiana and the beaches of Alabama, Mississippi and Florida. This would require stopping the use of dispersants to allow the oil to reach the surface and using tankers to collect the oil. To date, the federal government has allowed BP to use more than 1,840,000 gallons of oil dispersant.

An accurate measurement of the flow of oil and collection of the oil spilled into the Gulf of Mexico could change the way people remember this gusher and their opinion of BP.  Once the leak is plugged and the oil is dispersed throughout the oceans of the world, who’s to say for certain whether BP’s oil well blowout gushed an average of 1,000 or 100,000 bbl/day of oil?

CLASS ACTION LAWSUITS

Teams of lawyers from across the country have descended on the Gulf Coast to file potential class-action lawsuits to recover damages suffered by the lead plaintiff(s) and absent class members as a result of the BP oil gusher.

A class action is a procedural device that permits one or more plaintiffs to file and prosecute a lawsuit on behalf of a larger group. The larger group consists of the class members who have suffered the same wrong at the hands of the defendant but who are too numerous for the court to adequately manage the lawsuit if each class member were required to be joined as named plaintiffs.

In order to proceed as a class action, the case must be “certified” as a class action: that is, a court must determine that the class action criteria set forth in Rule 23 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure have been met. A class certified under Rule 23(b)(3) is distinct from a class certified under Rule 23(b)(1) or (2) in one important way. If a Rule 23(b)(3) class is certified, “notice” of the class action must be sent to class members and an opportunity to “opt-out” of the class must be provided. In contrast, a class certified under Rule 23(b)(1) or (2) is “mandatory,” notice is not required, and no class member may opt-out. Despite requirements regarding the notice that must be given to absent class members, there is always the possibility that many class members will not receive notice of the litigation or that such notice will be insufficient to fully inform them of their rights, thereby depriving them of any meaningful opportunity to opt-out.

If a class is certified and the class representatives are unsuccessful, the absent class members‘ claims will be “legally obliterated” by the result of the litigation, even though they did not actively participate in the suit.

The Supreme Court has observed that, while the text of Rule 23 does not preclude certification in cases with significant damages, the drafters “had dominantly in mind” the use of the class action to aggregate relatively small individual recoveries into a case that would be worthwhile for an attorney to litigate.

Given that the damages suffered by the vast majority of individual potential plaintiffs as a result of the BP oil gusher are potentially so great, it should be economically feasible for many individual plaintiffs to file individual lawsuits. Here, class treatment would not be necessary to permit effective litigation of the claim. An individual lawsuit would: (a) ensure the plaintiff that the plaintiff’s attorney has his or her best interests in mind; (b) protect the plaintiff’s due process rights; (c) ensure that the plaintiff is not a victim of a class action case in which individual class members receive little or no compensation and only plaintiffs‘ counsel stand to benefit from class certification; (d) give the plaintiff control over the prosecution of the case; (e) allow the plaintiff to present evidence of exposure, injury, and damages relating to his or her particular claim; and (f) allow the plaintiff to make the decision on whether or when to settle.

BP Plc, the responsible party, is a powerful and well-funded defendant, does not lack imagination or incentive to pose innumerable legal barriers, and will aggressively assert its legal rights and otherwise use the law, the courts and the judicial system to serve its interests. BP can afford to stall, and actually benefits from delay, but its victims cannot afford to wait for years to be fully compensated for their losses.

Victims of the BP oil gusher who have suffered significant losses should dare to demand justice by immediately seeking competent legal counsel, filing individual lawsuits, and actively participating in the litigation of their claims.

BP OIL SPILL VICTIM COMPENSATION FUND

On June 16, 2010 President Obama announced that BP has agreed to set aside $20 billion to pay economic damage claims to people and businesses that have been affected by the BP oil gusher. President Obama stated, “This $20 billion will provide substantial assurance that the claims people and businesses have will be honored. It’s also important to emphasize this is not a cap.  The people of the Gulf have my commitment that BP will meet its obligations to them. BP has publicly pledged to make good on the claims that it owes to the people in the Gulf, and so the agreement we reached sets up a financial and legal framework to do it.

Another important element is that this $20 billion fund will not be controlled by either BP or by the government. It will be put in a escrow account, administered by an impartial, independent third party. So if you or your business has suffered an economic loss as a result of this spill, you’ll be eligible to file a claim for part of this $20 billion. This fund does not supersede either individuals’ rights or states’ rights to present claims in court. BP will also continue to be liable for the environmental disaster it has caused, and we’re going to continue to work to make sure that they address it.”

The Obama administration indicated any money paid to claimants will be counted against future settlements, to prevent double-dipping.

BP and the Obama administration agreed to appoint Kenneth Feinberg, a Washington lawyer and Democratic Party supporter who administered the claims process for victims of 9/11, to run the independent claims process commonly referred to as the BP Oil Spill Victim Compensation Fund.  Feinberg declined to comment on how much BP is paying him to run the fund.

BP’s offer to settle quickly might be a savvy move if Feinberg can obtain ironclad releases from the shrimpers, hotel owners and thousands of other people who claim they’ve lost money because of the gusher. BP could save hundreds of millions of dollars in legal fees by preemptively funding the settlement. Feinberg said that at his request, lawyers for BP will be involved in drafting releases that exempt BP – but not other potential defendants – from any future liability for the spill. “This makes sense, since the release is designed to provide BP protection from lawsuits, and BP is paying $20 billion to satisfy claims,” Feinberg said in an e-mail message.

In theory, Feinberg and BP’s lawyers can craft an ironclad release, like the ones used to settle car-accident lawsuits every day. However, that could be a difficult proposition. “In practice, with this incident not only is there an ongoing catastrophe today, but its full effects won’t be felt for years,” said Burton LeBlanc, an attorney in the Baton Rouge, La., office of Baron & Budd, a Dallas firm that is prominent in asbestos and toxic-tort litigation. “The damages for some constituencies can’t be calculated yet.” Baron & Budd has even issued a news release reminding potential plaintiffs that the benzene in spilled oil can cause leukemia and lymphoma and pose “a serious health impact that can last for half a century.”

The BP fund is an attempt to buy peace by overwhelming potential plaintiffs with “easy” money. Companies have tried that before, with mixed success. Asbestos manufacturers failed miserably when they negotiated a global settlement with plaintiff lawyers in the early 1990s under which they’d pay out $300 million to injured workers in exchange for having cases of workers who were exposed, but not sick, valued at zero. The Supreme Court rejected the settlement in 1997 because it bound future claimants to terms they had no part in negotiating. The companies were out the $300 million and still faced thousands of asbestos lawsuits.

Feinberg’s Roadshow
On July 15, 2010, Feinberg, flying on a private jet paid for by BP, toured Louisiana and tried to assure affected residents they would be fairly compensated. He announced that he expects to set up shop for the independent BPOSVCF within the next two to three weeks. The BPOSVCF will operate for three years.

Feinberg explained the compensation plan includes two components: a no-obligation six month emergency payment for lost income and a final lump-sum payment with acceptance of release for BP. All victims can apply for the six month payment, up until ninety days after the well is capped. However, if claimants choose to accept the second and final BPOSVCF offer, they waive any right to bring further court proceedings against BP.

If victims do not consider the final offer sufficient, they may turn it down and pursue higher payments through the courts. However, Feinberg views the lack of court proceedings associated with his facility as a win-win for both sides. “Everyone should come in,” and the matter will be over with, in a matter of weeks or months, rather than years.

“When the oil has stopped, and we all know where it is heading, then I really urge you to come forward with a lump-sum request for payment,” Mr. Feinberg said on July 15th at a town-hall meeting attended by hundreds in Houma, La. Fielding repeated queries about how long-term damage from the spill will be measured, he said that his team would make its best estimates in calculating its final reimbursement offers.

Feinberg plans to apply tort-law principles in weighing claims, meaning plaintiffs will have to show that their losses wouldn’t have occurred “but for” the oil spill. “I am determined to come up with a system more generous and more beneficial than if you file a lawsuit,” Feinberg said.

Opposition to the BPOSVCF
On July 13, 2010, Alabama Attorney General Troy King wrote a letter to President Obama, urging the president to scrap Feinberg’s proposals for administering the BPOSVCF. “The document appears collusive at best and contrary to the public interest at worst,” King wrote to Obama. King said he was shocked that the Gulf states hadn’t been asked for input before Feinberg and BP reached the ninth draft of the plan. He called it “an illegal attempt” to limit BP’s liability under federal law. He also said that it aimed to keep people who have suffered damage out of state courts by making them sign a release waiving lawsuits or additional claims against BP.

“The federal government, especially the executive branch, has no business usurping state court jurisdiction and meddling in the state law liability arising from the oil spill,” King wrote.

Given that losses could continue for months or years after the gusher is stopped, King is justifiably concerned that the BPOSVCF would terminate interim claims ninety days after the well is capped and allow just one final claim thereafter.

On July 14, 2010, attorneys general from the five Gulf states met with U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder in Mobile, Alabama. Attorney General  Jim Hood of Mississippi and Attorney General Troy King of Alabama said the meeting was dominated by talk of a proposal Feinberg sent to the Gulf states that would have ended claims payments ninety days after the well is capped and required people to sign a release of liability before collecting their last payment from the BPOSVCF.

Hood said Holder recognized the flaws in the current BPOSVCF plan. “This is going to go on for three, five, ten years after the spill is stopped,” Hood said. Mr. Feinberg “can’t treat it like 9/11,” which, Hood said, for all of its horror, took place on a single day.

King said Holder would put together a panel of attorneys and officials, with heavy representation from the Gulf Coast, to draft a new proposal to submit to Feinberg. “The focus should be on protecting the Gulf states and making sure everyone is made whole,” said King.

Issues BP Victims Must Consider
Many businesses are concerned it will be difficult, if not impossible, to forecast the long-term recovery of the crab and shrimp populations, or how quickly U.S. consumers will re-embrace Gulf seafood, among other things.

Gary Bauer, president of Pontchartrain Blue Crab Inc., a seafood wholesaler and processor on Salt Bayou east of New Orleans, said his sales of blue crab and shrimp have dropped to 20% of their normal $8 million-a-year pace. In addition, foreign seafood suppliers are moving in on his network of grocers, restaurants and other buyers, further denting his long-term prospects. “Are we going to have a crab season next year, and are there going to be fishermen who will fish next year?” Mr. Bauer said. “How does BP reimburse for that? I spent 10 years of my life building a brand, and they destroyed it.”

Wayne Hess, manager of American Seafood Inc., a processor and wholesaler in New Orleans, said his sales were down roughly 30% from their annual average of $5 million to $7 million. “How am I supposed to project my losses not knowing how all of the different species we carry will be affected in the next year to five years?” he said. “The female crabs that are mating right now don’t drop their eggs until October or December. Those larvae may not make it.”

How can those in the tourism and fishing industries possibly know the extent of the damage to their business without knowing what next year’s season will be like? How can a person predict the long-term health effects of his or her exposure to the oil? As noted above, the benzene in spilled oil can cause leukemia and lymphoma and pose “a serious health impact that can last for half a century.”

So far, economic damage estimates vary widely. Greater New Orleans Inc., the economic-development agency for the 10-parish area, published preliminary estimates that the region’s fishing industry stands to suffer annual losses ranging from $900 million to $3.3 billion.

According to estimates from bond rating agency Moody’s, BP has total proven reserves of approximately 18 billion barrels of oil in the ground. BP has the ability and responsibility to fully compensate each and every BP oil gusher victim.

Conflict of Interest
“I’m working for you,” Feinberg repeatedly stated to the crowds of victims in Louisiana, and he called for local collaboration.

Feinberg is being compensated by BP, travels on a private jet paid for by BP, and has requested that lawyers for BP, not attorneys general from the Gulf states, be involved in drafting releases that exempt BP – but not other potential defendants – from any future liability for the spill.

An important rule of interpretation in administrative law is the “duck rule” – if it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck, it’s probably a duck. Abraham Lincoln reportedly explained a stronger version of this rule in his answer to the question, “If you call a dog’s tail a leg, how many legs does a dog have? Four. Just because you call the tail a leg doesn’t make it one.” Feinberg is a BP duck. Just because he says he is working for you doesn’t mean he is.

Councilman Thomas Capella from Jefferson Parish, Louisiana asked Feinberg if claimants should hire an attorney. Feinberg said that’s not necessary because his office will have attorneys on staff to provide free services to individuals and businesses. The fact that Feinberg’s attorneys intend to represent both BP and BP’s victims is an egregious conflict of interest.

“I am determined to come up with a system more generous and more beneficial than if you file a lawsuit,” Feinberg said. The question is whether the system will be more generous and more beneficial for BP or BP’s victims.

Animated and lively, with a little Bostonian humor, it has been reported Feinberg held the attention of the overflowing crowds during his recent roadshow in Louisiana. A reporter stated, “He jabs the air, punches up words to drive home a point and gets laughs with self-deprecating references to his Boston accent.” Rather than saying “cheese” when he posed for a photo with four police officers, he said, “Everybody file a claim?”

The following joke may be more appropriate for Feinberg’s BPOSVCF plan:

Question: What is the name of the bayou that is most representative of the federal government’s response to the victims of the BP oil gusher?
Answer: Bayou Self

CONCLUSION

Under the CWA alone, gross negligence penalties based upon 3,768,934 barrels of oil spilled would equal $16,206,416,200. Unfortunately, the federal government has no intention of holding BP accountable under either OPA 90 or CWA. Pursuant to OPA Section 4201, and given that the BP oil spill is a “discharge posing substantial threat to public health or welfare,” President Obama should have federalized the collection of the oil that is in the sea and the restoration of the coastal areas impacted by the oil. Both of these activities could be done without having to federalize the operational priority of stopping the flow of oil from the well. To date, the federal government has allowed BP to use more than 1,840,000 gallons of oil dispersant. Once the well is capped and the oil is dispersed throughout the oceans of the world, who’s to say for certain whether BP’s oil well blowout gushed an average of 1,000 or 100,000 bbl/day of oil?

Each individual potential plaintiff who has suffered damages as a result of the BP oil gusher should immediately seek competent legal counsel to directly represent his or her interests. If the amount of damages suffered by the individual potential plaintiff is small, it may not be economically feasible for the plaintiff to file an individual lawsuit. Accordingly, a class action lawsuit may be in the best interests of this plaintiff. However, given that the damages suffered by the vast majority of individual potential plaintiffs as a result of the BP oil gusher are potentially so great and will be on-going, class treatment would not be necessary to permit effective litigation of the claim. Here, when the amount of damages suffered by the individual is so great, the filing of an individual lawsuit should be economically feasible and may be in the best interests of the plaintiff. This decision should be made by the potential plaintiff only after a thorough consultation with his or her legal counsel.

The BPOSVCF is not administered by an impartial, independent third party. However, claimants will only waive their right to sue if they accept a final lump-sum payment. They can still sue if they only accept an initial emergency payment. Therefore, acceptance of a no-obligation six month emergency payment for lost income may be in the best interests of victims of the BP oil gusher. The decision to accept a final lump-sum payment, and thereby waive any right to bring further court proceedings against BP, should be made by the BP oil gusher victim only after a thorough consultation with his or her legal counsel.

APPENDICES

References
Adams, Mike, “First Amendment suspended in the Gulf of Mexico as spill cover-up goes Orwellian,” NaturalNews (July 3, 2010), available at: http://www.naturalnews.com/029130_Gulf_of_Mexico_censorship.html

Bhattacharyya, S., P.L. Klerks, and J.A. Nyman. 2003. Toxicity to freshwater organisms from oils and oil spill chemical treatments in laboratory microcosms. Environmental Pollution 122:205-215.

BP is Not the Only Responsible Party, available at: http://renergie.wordpress.com/2010/05/25/bp-is-not-the-only-responsible-party/

Chokkavelu, Anand, “The BP Stat That Will Shock You,” Motley Fool (July 9, 2010), available at: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/38165954/ns/business-motley_fool/

Clean Water Act

EPA: http://www.epa.gov/oem/content/lawsregs/opaover.htm

Fisher, Daniel and Hawkins, Asher, “BP’s Legal Blowout,” Forbes.com (July 14, 2010)

Greenwald, Glenn, “The BP/Government police state,” Salon (July 5, 2010), available at:
http://www.salon.com/news/opinion/glenn_greenwald/2010/07/05/bp/index.html

Hals, Tom, “Analysis: BP investors face tough road in court fights,” Reuters (July 16, 2010)

Hudson, Kris and Baskin, Brian, “Fears Mount That Fund Won’t Cover All Damages,” The Wall Street Journal (July 15, 2010)

Kindy, Kimberly, “Recovery effort falls vastly short of BP’s promises,” Washington Post
(July 6, 2010), available at:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/07/05/AR2010070502937.html

Lustgarten, Abrahm, “Chemicals Meant To Break Up BP Oil Spill Present New Environmental Concerns,” ProPublica (April 30, 2010), available at: http://www.propublica.org/article/bp-gulf-oil-spill-dispersants-0430

MMS: http://www.mms.gov/

Murtaugh, Dan, “Attorney General Eric Holder says he’ll try to address oil spill claims concerns,” Press-Register (July 15, 2010)

National Contingency Plan

NOAA: http://www.noaa.gov/

Oil Pollution Act of 1990

Peters, Jeremy W., “Efforts to Limit the Flow of Spill News,” The New York Times (June 9, 2010)

Philips, Matthew, “BP’s Photo Blockade of the Gulf Oil Spill,” Newsweek (May 26, 2010), available at: http://www.newsweek.com/2010/05/26/the-missing-oil-spill-photos.html

Schoof, Renee and Bolstad, Erika, “BP well may be spewing 100,000 barrels a day, scientist says,” McClatchy Newspapers (June 7, 2010), available at: http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2010/06/07/95467/bp-well-may-be-spewing.html

Schoof, Renee, “Scientists propose big experiment to study Gulf oil spill,” McClatchy Newspapers (July 11, 20100, available at:
http://www.miamiherald.com/2010/07/11/1725271/scientists-propose-big-experiment.html

Schwartz, John, “More Delicate Diplomacy for the Overseer of the Compensation Fund,” The New York Times (July 16, 2010)

USA Today: http://content.usatoday.com/communities/greenhouse/post/2010/05/how-responsible-is-us-government-for-gulf-oil-spill/

USCG: http://www.uscg.mil/

Walsh, Bryan, “The Oil Spill and the Perils of Losing Trust,” Time (July 7, 2010), available at:
http://ecocentric.blogs.time.com/2010/07/07/the-oil-spill-and-the-perils-of-losing-trust/
About the Author
Brian J. Donovan is an attorney and marine engineer with thirty-five years of international business experience.

Mr. Donovan, a member of The Florida Bar, The U.S. District Court, Middle District of Florida and The United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit, holds a J.D. from Syracuse University College of Law (where he was recipient of the “Global Law & Practice Award” as the outstanding graduate in the areas of International Law and International Business Law) and a B.S., with honors, in Marine/Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering from the United States Merchant Marine Academy.

Mr. Donovan, with deep family roots in southern Louisiana, has first-hand knowledge of the catastrophic devastation of the Louisiana Gulf Coast caused by hurricanes Katrina and Rita. He fully appreciates that the damage caused by Katrina and Rita may pale in comparison to the massive and potentially unprecedented environmental and economic impact of the BP oil gusher of April, 2010.

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One Response

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  1. classvictim said, on December 25, 2012 at 1:23 am

    I take it you’ve see this. And if not how would you like to hold the first reverse class action. That’s where the real victims sues the f out of all the parties including the attorneys of phoney claims


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